Australian Power Quality & Reliability Centre

Established 1996

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Kashem Muttaqi Photo

Professor Kashem Muttaqi

Professor

School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering

Tel: +61 2 4221 3413

Fax: +61 2 4221 3236

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Biography

Dr. Kashem Muttaqi received his Bachelor of Science in Electrical and Electronic Engineering degree from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET), Bangladesh in 1993. He then received Masters of Engineering in Science degree from the University of Malaya (UM), Malaysia in 1997, and received his Doctor of Philosophy degree from Multimedia University (MMU), Malaysia in 2001. Currently, he is an Associate Professor at the School of Electrical, Computer and Telecommunications Engineering and member of Australian Power Quality and Reliability Centre (APQRC) at the University of Wollongong. He was associated with the University of Tasmania, Australia as a Research Fellow/Lecturer/Senior Lecturer from 2002 to 2007, and with the Queensland University of Technology, Australia as a Research Fellow from 2000 to 2002. Previously, he worked for Multimedia University, Malaysia as a Lecturer from 1997 to 2000. He also worked as an Electrical Executive for KTA Tenaga (Consulting Engineers) in Malaysia from 1996 to 1997. Dr. Muttaqi worked as the Deputy-Director of the Centre for Renewable Energy and Power systems (CREPS) at the University of Tasmania before he joined the University of Wollongong. In recognition of his skills in the sphere of teaching and learning, he was awarded a 'Teaching Merit Certificate' in 2004 from the University of Tasmania. He is a Senior Member of IEEE and Member of the IEEE/PES. His special fields of interests include distributed generation, renewable energy, power system planning, intelligent grid, and power system reliability.

Projects

  • Project 1:

    ARC Project: Smart Grid Testing Facility
    Project started: July 2015
    Project Duration: One Year
    Total Grant Value: $430,000 (ARC) + $280,000 (Universities) = $710,000
    Project Sponsored by: ARC and three Universities (University of Sydney, University of Wollongong and University of Newcastle) through ARC Linkage Infrastructure, Equipment and Facilities Project
    Personnel involved: Thirteen Chief Investigators from three Universities

    Summary: This proposal aims to establish an essential part of infrastructure required for experimental research in the area of distributed resources under smart grid. The innovative theoretical methodologies being developed under existing or completed competitive research projects in this area will be validated through experimental research. The proposed experimental platform will also help to resolve technical issues related to future power supply systems including real-time data from smart meters, application of vehicle to grid systems, demand management, control and protection aspects under uncertain nature of renewable energy sources. This will bring together the researchers in this area to utilise the facility for collaborative research.

  • Project 2:

    ARC Project: Distributed Energy Storage Management System
    Project started: January 2014
    Project Duration: Three Years
    Total Grant Value: $158,000 (ARC) + $120,000 (Industry) = $278,000
    Project Sponsored by: ARC and Optus through ARC Linkage Project
    Personnel involved: Three Chief Investigators from two Universities (Macquarie University and University of Wollongong), One Partner Investigator, and Four PhD Students

    Summary: Transport consumes 50% of energy in modern society, hence electric vehicles will be a significant load (or source) of energy in future electricity distribution grids. Real-time information about the varying distribution and state of charge of electric vehicle batteries will be critical to mobile storage management and maintaining the quality of supply in future "smart-grid" electricity distribution systems. The main aim and expected outcome of this project is the development of a scalable and real-time wireless vehicle tracking, mapping, and energy monitoring system for managing distributed energy storage in future "smart-grids" incorporating electric vehicles.

  • Project 3:

    RIBG Project: Experimental Platform for Solar Photovoltaic Integration
    Project started: 2012
    Project Duration: One Year
    Total Grant Value: Value: $75,000 (URC) + $20,000 (Co-funds) = $95,000
    Project Sponsored by: UOW
    Personnel involved: Seven Primary Users and Three PhD Students

    Summary: This funding proposal aims to establish an essential part of infrastructure required for experimental research in renewable power generation, integration and utilisation; a photovoltaic (PV) array emulator and an AC controllable load. The innovative theoretical methodologies being developed on renewable power generation and utilisation under existing ARC research projects will be validated through experimental research. The work to be undertaken has special application for facilitating integration of renewable energy sources, such as solar generation system into the grid, and to examine their off-grid (islanding) operation for supply continuity. The proposed experimental platform will also help to resolve technical issues related to micro-grid and remote area power supply systems including hybrid operation of energy resources (e.g. solar, wind and energy storage), control and protection aspects operating under the uncertain nature of renewable energy sources. It is to be noted that a wind power simulator and energy storage technologies are already available, however the PV array emulator, the AC controllable load and associated components are requested from URC to validate the developed methodologies of the existing grants. The quality of power generated by renewable energy generating systems will be assessed experimentally to ensure that they are able to meet the connection standards.

  • Project 4:

    ARC Project: Integration of Solar, Wind and Storage Systems into Distribution Grids for Network Support
    Project started: July 2010
    Project Duration: Three Years
    Total Grant Value: $420,000 (ARC) + $150,000 (Industry) = $570,000
    Project Sponsored by: ARC and Country Energy through ARC Linkage Project
    Personnel involved: Four Chief Investigators, One Partner Investigator, One Research Fellow, and Three PhD Students

    Summary: Renewable energy integration into electricity grids offers a climate responsive approach to electricity generation and distribution. Connecting a large number of multiple renewable resources to electricity networks has the potential to cause problems in network operation such as hunting for voltage correction, unnecessary tripping of power converters, control interaction, network instability and malfunction of protection devices. This research will develop new methodologies and technologies for minimising these problems, and devise assessment tools to identify associated power quality issues, network sensitivity to instability and protection performance at different levels of renewable energy penetration for network support.

  • Project 5:

    RIBG Project: Experimental Platform for Hybridisation of Renewable Energy Resources
    Project started: 2010
    Project Duration: One Year
    Total Grant Value: $63,000 (URC) + $5,000 (Co-funds) = $68,000
    Project Sponsored by: UOW
    Personnel involved: Seven Primary Users and Two PhD Students

    Summary: This project aims to establish an essential part of infrastructure required for experimental research on renewable power generation, integration and utilisation. The innovative theoretical methodologies being developed on renewable power generation and utilisation under existing ARC research projects will be validated through experimental research. The work to be undertaken has special application for facilitating integration of renewable energy sources, such as wind generation systems into the grid, and to examine their off-grid (islanding) operation for supply continuity. The proposed experimental platform will also help to resolve technical issues related to remote area power supply systems including hybrid operation of energy resources, control and protection aspects under uncertain nature of renewable energy sources. The quality of power generated by renewable energy generating systems will be experimentally assessed to ensure that they can meet the connection standards.

  • Project 6:

    RIBG Project: Experimental Platform for Renewable Energy Generation, Integration and Utilisation
    Total Grant Value: $40,000 (URC) + $20,000 (Co-funds) = $60,000
    Project started: 2008
    Project Duration: One Year
    Project Sponsored by: UOW
    Personnel involved: Four Primary Users, Two Research Fellows, and Three PhD Students

    Summary: This project aims to establish an essential part of infrastructure required for experimental research on renewable power generation, integration and utilisation. The innovative theoretical methodologies being developed on renewable power generation and utilisation under existing ARC research projects will be validated through experimental research. The work to be undertaken has special application for facilitating integration of renewable energy sources, such as wind generation systems into the grid, and to examine their off-grid (islanding) operation for supply continuity. The proposed experimental platform will also help to resolve technical issues related to remote area power supply systems including hybrid operation of energy resources, control and protection aspects under uncertain nature of renewable energy sources. The quality of power generated by renewable energy generating systems will be experimentally assessed to ensure that they can meet the connection standards.

  • Project 7:

    ARC Linkage Project: On-line Monitoring and Modelling of Electric Loads for Improving Operational Conditions of Power Systems
    Total Grant Value: $456,000
    Collaborative Institutes: University of Wollongong, University of Tasmania, and Queensland University of Technology Project started: October 2007
    Project Duration: Three Years
    Project Sponsored by: Australian Research Council (ARC) and Transend Networks Tasmania through ARC Linkage Project
    Personnel involved: Four Chief Investigators, Three Research Fellows

    Summary: The characteristics of loads are the main uncertainty in the modelling of responses of a power system. This project aims to develop a process of characterising the response of key loads to large disturbances, and improve the predictability of the power system responses to major disturbances. In this project, major loads in the Tasmanian power system will be modelled in order to determine the system's dynamic response under different operational conditions. This project will also develop techniques for identifying load composition and predicting load behaviour from on-line measurements in order to avoid incidents that result in customer loads being disconnected.

  • Project 8:

    ARC Linkage Project: Hybrid Remote Area Power systems with Hydrogen Energy Storage for isolated and Regional Communities
    Total Grant Value: $462,000
    Collaborative Institutes: University of Wollongong, and University of Tasmania Project started: December 2006
    Project Duration: Three Years
    Project Sponsored by Australian Research Council (ARC) and Hydro Tasmania through ARC Linkage Project
    Personnel involved: Three Chief Investigators, Two Research Fellows, Three PhD Students

    Summary: Typically electricity for remote and isolated communities in regional areas is supplied with conventional diesel generators. This project aims to develop hybrid stand-alone power systems with wind as the renewable energy source and hydrogen as the primary energy storage medium. Innovative and practical technologies will be developed for cost-effective operation and control of hybrid remote area power systems. Reduced diesel fuel consumption and air pollution will be achieved by injecting electrolytically produced hydrogen and diesel into the engine. Such a hybrid system will produce reliable, high quality power under all conditions to fulfil customer demands at a reduced cost.

  • Project 9:

    ARC Discovery Project: Optimising Control of Hydroelectric Turbines Subject to Basslink Instability
    Total Grant Value: $91,064
    Project started: June 2006
    Project Duration: Three Years
    Project Sponsored by: Australian Research Council (ARC) through ARC Discovery Project
    Personnel involved: One Chief Investigator, One PhD Student, One Research Assistant (Part-time)

    Summary: The advent of Basslink, a High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) link into the national power grid has potential to introduce oscillation and/or instability into Tasmania's power systems. The control tuning of hydroelectric turbines will be degraded by disturbances such as start/stop, power-flow reversal and converter switching of Basslink. This project will develop strategies for control tuning of hydro turbines to reduce the risk of generation instability. The developed techniques will improve damping oscillation and stabilise the power systems experiencing disturbances. The research outcome is a stable operation of power networks in Tasmania with applications nationally and internationally in similar supply networks.

  • Project 10:

    ARC Linkage Project: Integration of Distributed and Renewable Power Generation into Electricity Grid systems
    Total Grant Value: $247,914
    Collaborative Institutes: University of Wollongong, University of Tasmania, and Queensland University of Technology Project started: 2005
    Project Duration: Three Years
    Project Sponsored by: Australian Research Council (ARC) and Aurora Energy Tasmania through ARC Linkage Project
    Personnel involved: Three Chief Investigators, Two PhD Students, Part-time Research Assistant

    Summary: This project aims to contribute into infrastructure development for connection of distributed and renewable power generation with electrical grid systems. The project proposes to develop innovative methodologies for cost-effective operation and control, protection coordination and fault detection, islanding operation, grid interaction and voltage instability with distributed and renewable generation. This project has special application for facilitating integration of renewable and distributed energy sources, such as wind, solar, mini-hydro, etc. into national grid systems.

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